Dog on the Lamb


Actually, nobody is on the lamb – but Livi is on the way to her new home. That’s #14 foster, folks – in only 1.5 years. Not too bad, huh? They each have their own unique challenges and charms, but I think Livi’s challenge is the most difficult for the town I live in – Boulder “dog on every corner” Colorado.

So Livi is extremely unpredictable around other dogs. Actually, I shouldn’t say it that way because I can easily predict that after some period of time at the dog park, Livi will find a dog she wants to eat. Little or big, there’s always someone who looks like a tasty meal.

Honestly, I don’t think she’s trying to eat them – she just really doesn’t know how to play. My faith in her is where I got into trouble. She had been doing fine for a few days, and so I had relaxed a bit. Then, all of a sudden, she decided to harass the wrong dog. The owner clearly hadn’t been around dog parks much, and she immediately called animal control on me, complaining that I can’t try to resolve my foster dog’s issues at the expense of other dogs. Yes, I agreed and apologized. I guess that wasn’t good enough for her, and this morning I found myself standing in front of a judge – seriously.

What a trip! I can truthfully say that I barely even received detention in school, so naturally I was distraught about going to court. My good friend Mandy came with me for moral support, and we actually ended up having a great time. In my mind, we went to see a play and tickets were $25 each (I was buying).

To prep for the show, Mandy looked up the statue and I called the court, baffled about why I couldn’t just pay my fine via mail. They explained that I had to come in and talk with a judge and a District Attorney, who would give me options. Options? Like paying my fine and going back to bed? Yes, she said. Okey-dokey.

At court this morning I asked around as to why others were there, and the were almost all college students with alcohol-related charges. The guy next to me lost his best friend’s passport when the bouncer asked him “his” middle name and he didn’t know it! (Come on, the first rule of fake ID use is to know what it says!) Finally it was my turn and the judge called my name. I almost started laughing at the irony – the last time my named was called through a microphone was two weeks earlier when I received my master’s degree. In retrospect, given the choice, I would take the court “ceremony” over the master’s degree one because it was much shorter and more interesting!

Anyhoo, the judge asked how I would plead, and I said, “Guilty.” (If I said “not guilty” I would have had to go to trial… for a $50 fine!). She asked if I had anything else to say, and I said,”Yes.” I went on to explain that Livi was my foster, she scared a dog with her version of play, and then I put her right back on leash. I apologized and said I didn’t mind paying the fine, but was very confused as to why I had to come to court. The judge agreed, and waived my court fees as I had hoped she would. The fine was then paid and the mission accomplished – almost.

A woman was coming to meet Livi at 3:30, maybe to adopt her. She sounded just perfect – a young runner who was interested in agility and would be committed to training Livi. Would she like her?

Success! Livi’s new mom loved her, and what’s not to love? (Except the dog aggression, that is). She took Livi home, and let’s cross our fingers that they live happily ever after. Do Bill and I miss her already? Sure, but we were VERY happy to go on a hike and celebrate our new-found freedom!

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