Rescue SPOTlight: Houston Beagle and Hound Rescue

Today’s Rescue SPOTlight shines on Houston Beagle and Hound rescue out of Texas. This is a wonderful rescue that saves the lives of many needy Beagles. They are participating in the creation of Up For Pups’ Rescue Best Practices Manual.

  • Mission: “Our long-term goal is to educate the public regarding the tragic pet over-population problem in the U.S. and around the world, so that rescue will one day no longer be needed.”
  • Date founded: 1990
  • Types of animals you take in: mostly purebred beagles
  • Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals): Small
  • Your name: Elizabeth Emery
  • Your position in the rescue: Board Member – Fundraising & Events
  • How long you’ve been with the rescue: almost 3 years
  • What you like best about animal rescue: attempting to make a difference
  • What you think is hardest about animal rescue: having to say we can’t take one because we have no room
  • Share one quick story about a rescue experience: For the most part, people that have beagles are extremely fussy about where they are boarded.  I decided to offer boarding in my home for my previous fosters.  I love having them come back to me for a while and being able to spend time with them again.  It gives me the opportunity to see how much they’ve blossomed in their new homes.  And that makes me feel better about giving them up.

Rescue SPOTlight: GRFR

This week’s Rescue SPOTlight shines on Golden Retriever Freedom Rescue (GRFR), a Colorado-based, volunteer-driven, 501(c)3 non-profit rescue organization that has been helping with Up For Pups’ rescue best practices manual.

  • Mission: Our mission is to rescue, foster, rehabilitate, and adopt out abused, neglected, and unwanted Golden Retrievers to permanent homes. All of our Goldens are currently in foster homes, which enables GRFR to better assess the temperament of each Golden for matching to the appropriate permanent home and provides prospective owners the opportunity to visit the Golden in a non-kennel environment.
  • Date founded: 2001
  • Types of animals you take in: Golden Retrievers, Golden Retriever mixes, Labrador Retrievers, and Lab mixes of all colors
  • Size of Rescue: Large
  • Your name: Kari and Tim Workman
  • Your position in the rescue: foster family
  • How long you’ve been with the rescue: since 2009
  • What you like best about animal rescue: The dogs! We love going to the transports and seeing all of the dogs come in to Colorado, knowing their lives are going to get better! We love meeting new dogs, getting to know their personalities, and finding them perfect homes. We especially love fostering puppy mill survivors and watching them really blossom with their new found love. We love that fostering is something we can enjoy as a whole family, our 3 year old son included.
  • What you think is hardest about animal rescue: The whole fact that “animal rescue” is a necessary thing is the hardest part about animal rescue.
  • Share one quick story about a rescue experience: Our first foster dog was then known as Cindy. She was supposedly coming from a family who had to surrender her and was great around kids. When we met her, she had to be pulled out of the kennel. She flattened to the ground like a pancake, had to be carried to our car, and had no idea what a home was. She was terrified of anything and everything! It took her days before she would eat, weeks before she would walk outside by herself, and months before she would look at anyone who came near her. She was obviously not from a family. We started researching puppy mills, and she displayed nearly all of the characteristics of a mill survivor. From the moment we met her, we were in love. Cindy is now Evelyn and is happily living with us…Our first foster became our first foster failure!

 

 

Rescue SPOTlight: NCSR

Today’s Rescue SPOTlight shines on Northern Chesapeake Sheltie Rescue, Inc., an outstanding organization in Maryland and participant in Up For Pups’ Rescue Best Practices Manual.

  • Mission: Our founding philosophy is to assist Shelties regardless of age or condition whenever possible.  We also strive to assist other Sheltie rescue groups whenever possible, in the understanding that if a dog is in need, we are all in this together.
  • Date founded: Nov 1, 1999
  • Types of animals you take in: dogs (Shetland sheepdog)
  • Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals): Mid
  • Your name: Linda Isbell
  • Your position in the rescue: President
  • How long you’ve been with the rescue:12 years
  • What you like best about animal rescue: How rewarding it is to rehab these dogs and find them new homes
  • What you think is hardest about animal rescue: worry about foster homes, money, and keeping our heads and hearts above water
  • Share one quick story about a rescue experience: We took in an abuse case, a starved and filthy Sheltie that was taken in an equine abuse case when he was found with the horses in the stables.  The shelter vet suggested euthanasia, but the shelter manager called me and we went and got Buckshot…Buck for short….and literally held him wrapped in blankets for weeks and weeks….he improved daily and now has a wonderful new family in NJ!

Rescue SPOTlight: Arizona Basset Hound Rescue

Today’s Rescue SPOTlight shines on Arizona Basset Hound Rescue, an outstanding organization in Arizona and participant not only in our upcoming book, Lost Souls: FOUND! Inspiring Stories About Basset Hounds but also in Up For Pups’ Rescue Best Practices Manual.

  • Mission: As a non-profit 501 (c) (3) animal welfare organization, Arizona Basset Hound Rescue, Inc. provides veterinary care, food, support, and shelter to Basset Hounds, Bloodhounds and Basset Hound mixes needing assistance in Arizona. We treat these animals as our own, with the utmost care and respect and make decisions based on compassion for the quality of life these Basset Hounds, Bloodhounds and Basset Hound mixes will enjoy while in our care. We provide necessary support for the dogs while in the care of the foster home using the dogs’ personalities, behaviors, and special needs as a guide. We work in cooperation with local and state shelters to reduce euthanasia of Basset Hounds, Blood Hounds, and Basset Hound mixes.
  • Date founded: 1999
  • Types of animals you take in: Basset Hounds and Bloodhounds
  • Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals): Mid
  • Your name: Robin Martin
  • Your position in the rescue: Currently, Vice President – Intake
  • How long you’ve been with the rescue: 7 years
  • What you like best about animal rescue: Making a difference in the lives of animals that have come upon hard times.  Helping them find new forever loving homes.
  • What you think is hardest about animal rescue: Dealing with people and making people understand the plight on the animals in need
  • Share one quick story about a rescue experience: There are so many, but my boy Shammy came into Rescue at 43 pounds and totally hairless.  He had been deemed unadoptable by the local humane society, and they asked that AZBHR take him.  Shammy is now 75 pounds, and I have to Furminate him weekly.  Without the Rescue, Shammy would be gone and my life would be a little less full.

Rescue SPOTlight: Alliston & District Humane Society

This week’s rescue SPOTlight is on Alliston & District Humane Society of Ontario, CANADA, an organization that is helping Up For Pups, our sister non-profit organization, to create a Rescue Best Practices Manual:

• Mission: The ADHS attempts to provide shelter for stray and unwanted animals with priority given to abused and neglected animals.
• Date founded: 1988
• Types of animals you take in: Dogs, Cats, Small animals, Farm animals (in foster homes).
• Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals): Large

• Your name: Emily Day
• Your position in the rescue: Secretary, Board of Directors
• How long you’ve been with the rescue: 5+ years
• What you like best about animal rescue: Working directly with the animals.
• What you think is hardest about animal rescue: Saying goodbye.
• Share one quick story about a rescue experience: There are so many … We currently have a 7 month old male Beagle puppy, Charlie. He is a bundle of energy but hasn’t had a very nice beginning. He was found in a cardboard box on the side of the road – covered in mange. After being treated for mange, the people who found him decided that he had too much energy for them, and they did not want him anymore. They gave him away for free to a friend. This friend had the pup for a week and decided that he was chasing the cat too much and had to go. Charlie ended up in our care. He is a friendly enough guy, but he has some wicked separation and abandonment issues. He is rambunctious and has a LOT of energy. He mouths. He jumps. He tugs on the leash. He cries. He screams. He is a DRAMA QUEEN. Our volunteers are working with him to overcome these and many other issues he came in with. Charlie will stay with us until a new home is found or a suitable foster home is located.

Rescue SPOTlight: Legacy Boxer Rescue

Today’s Rescue SPOTlight shines on Legacy Boxer Rescue. LBR was one of the key contributors for Lost Souls: FOUND! Inspiring Stories about Boxers and is now assisting us with the development of a rescue best practices manual.

Legacy Boxer Rescue

Legacy Mission: For every life there is a legacy. In many instances the legacy passed down is not as it should be and requires help from caring souls to be fulfilled. It is our belief that all Boxers should have a legacy befitting of their wonderful enthusiasm and love of life, but sadly, this isn’t always the case.

We, the founder and volunteers of Legacy Boxer Rescue, have made it our mission to seek out these Boxers and create a legacy they deserve, a loving family and home of their own.

We firmly believe that a Boxer’s future should never be uncertain, so we will help to create better, happier legacies for them; one Boxer at a time.

A legacy that replaces despair with hope, sorrow with happiness, fear with security, and pain with love.

  • ·Date founded: March 18, 2004
  • ·Types of animals you take in: Boxer Dogs
  • ·Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals): Large
  • ·Your name: Sharon Sleighter
  • ·Your position in the rescue: President
  • ·How long you’ve been with the rescue: Founder
  • ·What you like best about animal rescue: Seeing a boxers spirit return; it’s an amazing thing. 🙂
  • ·What you think is hardest about animal rescue: Not being able to help them all.
  • ·Share one quick story about a rescue experience:

In November of 2004, LBR was a mere eight months old, and the financial aspect was not looking good for us. We were struggling to maintain enough money to pay the bills, and while we were very determined, we simply didn’t have the means to fundraise being so new. We had a small volunteer base and an even smaller support base.

Then fate struck in the name of a dog named Nemo, whom LBR needed as badly as he needed LBR.

One cold night just before Thanksgiving that year, we received an email from a shelter contact. The subject line read “ISO: BOXER RESCUE. MALE BOXER, WORST CASE OF MANGE EVER!!!”

There were no pictures. There was just that headline and a smaller note that said he would be euthanized that evening if no one stepped forward to take him. LBR raised our paw to help him and the wheels started turning. LBR’s version of “Finding Nemo” was on.

I sent Kristy to the shelter to get him, and told her I would meet her at the clinic. She called me after picking him up, sobbing. She said, “It’s awful. He’s an adult dog with no hair at all, and his skin cracks and bleeds when you touch him.”

She was afraid he was going to die in her car before she arrived. Needless to say, he didn’t die on the way, but nothing could have prepared me for what I was about to see when I walked into the clinic that night. This poor animal was skin and bones and just a bloody, infected mess from head to the tip of his long, natural tail. No spark in his eyes; no wag in his tail. Just sadness.

We considered, briefly, euthanizing him, as he had to be just miserable, but then I said to everyone in the room, “This is mange. We can fix this, and this is the worst he will ever feel from this moment on. Starting today, it’s all uphill.” We posted pictures of Nemo on our website, and the outpouring of care and support was almost overwhelming. In 24 hours we raised over $4,000.00 for Nemo, and if you know mange, well, it simply isn’t that costly to treat, so those donations helped us to help others like Nemo.

Nemo truly saved LBR as much as LBR saved Nemo. Nemo’s foster parents ended up adopting him after his ordeal, and he blossomed into a very handsome boxer. Though his scars were always apparent on the surface, his parents made sure they didn’t go any deeper. He enjoyed whipped cream from the spray can for treats and gave them several years of loyalty and love. Nemo, sadly, passed away in 2009 from lymphoma, but he will never be forgotten here at LBR.

Rescue SPOTlight: Mile High Weimaraner Rescue

Today’s SPOTlight is on Mile High Weimaraner Rescue of Colorado, an organization participating in the creation of Up For Pups’ Rescue Best Practices Manual.

  • Mission: We are an all-volunteer, non-profit rescue dedicated to the welfare of the Weimaraner breed. We take in Weimaraners that have been abandoned, surrendered, neglected or abused, place them in foster homes where they are given love, healthy diet, training, and rehabilitation to help them prepare for placement in a forever home.
  • Date founded: 2000
  • Types of animals you take in: Weimaraner and Weimaraner-mixes
  • Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals):Mid
  • Your name: Shereen Raucci
  • Your position in the rescue: Foster Mom, Event Coordinator and Committee Member
  • How long you’ve been with the rescue: 1+ years
  • What you like best about animal rescue: the love each foster dog shares with me, the privilege of earning their trust after a hard past, and knowing that I get to be a part of choosing their forever family
  • What you think is hardest about animal rescue: the realization that so many people think of dogs as “things” rather than loved ones and family members; hearing the horrid stories of abuse & neglect that these poor babes are made to endure before being rescued, and not being able to save them all.
  • Share one quick story about a rescue experience: The day I met Angel will forever be etched in my mind and Angel will forever be in my heart. I slowly approached the blue Weim crouched in the corner of the kennel, she was shaking in fear. I sat down nearby & she soon came to me & rested her head in my lap. I took Angel home with me then. She was my very first Weim foster, glued to my side, she trusted only me to protect her. Angel was a Mill dog that apparently knew no kindness in her past, she had scars from head to toe but a heart of gold. Weeks later, we learned Angel was pregnant. She delivered 4 healthy puppies via emergency c-section at CSU. Angel was a sweet, attentive, very loving mama but 9 days later she began to bleed uncontrollably. Covered in blood we ran red lights and stop signs to get to CSU, with her 4 angel babies wrapped in soft blankets in a box close to her. Angel survived emergency surgery and I was told I could come back to pick her up the next morning. At 3 a.m. I received the dreaded call that she had passed suddenly. My dear sweet Angel left behind 4 precious 10 day old Weim puppies. The rescue pulled together & moved the puppies to another foster home that had a lactating Weim foster….there Angels puppies thrived, in honor of their mama. Angel’s ashes are buried in the Memory Garden at my home, alongside her foster sister, Meg. Each morning we wander by and say good morning, knowing she is always close. Each of her puppies were named after Angels and are healthy, happy and well loved, and have their very own guardian Angel.

Rescue Spotlight: Nebraska Border Collie Rescue

Our rescue spotlight today is on Nebraska Border Collie Rescue, Inc. . This outstanding Border Collie rescue has been saving dogs since 1999, and they have generously offered their time to help in the creation of Up For Pups’ best practices manual.

Mission: Nebraska Border Collie Rescue is a 501(c)(3) non-profit, all volunteer organization dedicated to serving the immediate needs of Border Collies and Border Collie mixes in danger of harm or euthanasia, as well as educating the public to reduce the need for rescue in the future.

  • Date founded: Spring 1999
  • Types of animals you take in: Border Collies and Border Collie x
  • Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals): Mid
  • Your Name: Karen Battreall
  • Your position in the rescue: President
  • How long you’ve been with the rescue: 11 years
  • What you like best about animal rescue: Seeing a great dog go to a great family
  • What you think is hardest about animal rescue: Making the decision to euthanize
  • Share one quick story about a rescue experience: We had a very intelligent, energetic Border Collie that we felt would be hard to place.  She found a home but was returned because of her extreme intelligence and energy.  A second home was found with a retired rancher.  He reported to us that his wife suffered from a debilitating disease and hadn’t smiled in over a year.   Maggie had made his wife not only smile but laugh.  They went for walks around the ranch together and had become constant companions.

 

Rescue Spotlight: MidAmerica Boston Terrier Rescue

Happy Tails Books and Up For Pups are working together alongside 20+ reputable rescue organizations to create a best practices manual. We’ll be featuring a rescue each week so you can get to know the rescuers behind this mammoth effort. Read about the best practices manual at http://upforpups.org/

MidAmerica Boston Terrier Rescue

 

  • Rescue Name: MidAmerica Boston Terrier Rescue
  • Website: http://adoptaboston.com/
  • Mission: To rescue and re-home abandoned Boston Terriers and to persuade those interested in purchasing a dog to “adopt, and not shop”, meaning to not purchase a dog or puppy from a puppy mill or puppy mill-supplied pet store, but instead, to adopt a homeless dog to save a life.”
  • Date founded: November 2005
  • Types of animals you take in: Dog; Boston Terrier
  • Size of Rescue (Small=less than 50 animals, Mid=51-200 animals, Large=201+ animals): Large
  • Your name: Jennifer Misfeldt
  • Your position in the rescue: President/Founder
  • How long you’ve been with the rescue: November 2005
  • What you like best about animal rescue: the support from the public
  • What you think is hardest about animal rescue: inconsistency among multiple foster parents across multiple states
  • Share one quick story about a rescue experience:Here’s a poem from the MABTR website, which speaks for itself

To My First Rescue Dog

You came to me full grown
But very much like a puppy.
A human’s love you had not yet known.
Each pat on your head
Caused you to jump in a frenzy.
In your first hours you even shredded your bed.
Each experience was new and you were so amazed.
Inside the house you seemed overwhelmed.
Just the simplest things would capture your gaze.
Constant excitement was your state.
Your jumping and barking
Made you a challenging roommate.
But slowly you came to understand
And when I reach out
You no longer chewed on my hand.
Within a few months so calmly you sat.
Imploring with those sweet brown eyes
To give your head just one more pat.
The adoption day in mid-December
When you met your new family
Is one I will always remember.
I sent you on your way
With a final hug and kiss
Knowing your new life began that day.
You trotted away without a backward glance
And through my tears I smiled
Because you deserved this second chance.

 

Recognizing Rescuers: Linda Forrest and SOS Beagles

Every Tuesday we post someone’s kind words about a rescuer who has touched his or her life. Today Billie Moore wrote in to recognize Linda Forrest of SOS Beagle Rescue:
I have adopted four rescue beagles in my life, two have gone to the rainbow bridge at the age of fifteen. These two beagles were rescued from a local laboratory and were scheduled to be euthanized. I was able to adopt and they truly showed me that laboratory dogs can make good pets. A lot of love and patience will do the trick. My other two beagles both came from rescue groups. Brew and SOS Beagles. The first one was thirteen weeks  and the second was nine weeks when I adopted them.

We travel quite a bit these days and a trip would not be planned without them. They are both excellent travelers.  The fact that all my beagles were rescues gives me a great feeling of truly helping out a fur baby that needed a home. I have no regrets that they are rescue and not bought from some fancy breeder.
There are too many unwanted animals in the world with no where to lay their head. I feel rescue is the only way to go if you truly want to lend a hand to help a furry soul.  My dogs are a great compliment to our family and they are loved dearly.

Hats off the Linda Forrest for running SOS Beagles and for all the work she has done now and in the past to organize a great rescue and to match so many beagles with the right family. People like her are hard to find that are willing to work so hard for such a goal. May God bless her and all her beagles that she rescues and finds loving homes for. I can’t think of enough words to  encourage someone to adopt from a rescue or shelter except the rewards are GREAT.